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Full text of "Desoto (1928)"



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/desoto192800unse 




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ROXIE CjAULDINC., 

Editor 



Akvil O. Dowdy, 
Business Manager 



R. P. Clark, 
Assistant Editor 



Paul Morris, 
. 1 dvertising Manager 



Ruth James, 
Literary Editor 



Louise Acree, 
Art Editor 




Foreword 



<**§>(!- 



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In this volume of the De Soto we have 
endeavored to portray, in words and 
in pictures, a living year of the College. 






The De Soto of 1928 

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED 
— T( )— 

Governor Austin Peay 

IN RECOGNITION OF HIS 
NOTABLE SERVICE IN BEHALF OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM 

OF TENNESSEE. 



The West Tennessee State Teachers College us greatly indebted to him. It is 
experiencing a period of great expansion because of his friendly attitude and kindly 
consideration. New buildings are being erected — a monument to his administration — 
and larger funds are available for maintenance and operation, thus guaranteeing to the 
students of this year and all succeeding years larger opportunities for preparation for 
the important duties of life. And in appreciation there of the students and faculty of 
the College are paying him this tribute of respect and affection and admiration. 



RESOLUTIONS PASSED BY THE STATE HOARD OF EDUCATION 

The members of the State Board of Education in their work in the West Tenn- 
essee State Teachers College had come to know well Jack Brister, the only son of 
President and Mrs. J. W. Brister. The Board members feel that, because of the 
pureness of Jack's life, his mental alertness, and his lovable disposition, their lives have 
been enriched and made better by having come in contact with this splendid young 
life. We cannot understand why he must leave us now. We are thankful that 
we have been privileged to know him, and we believe that even his youthful life has 
made a finished contribution in its beautiful unselfishness and purity. Our deepest 
sympathies are with President and Mrs. Brister; and we pray for them that comfort 
that can come only from their own faith in the wisdom and final justice of Almighty 

God. 



RESOLUTIONS OV THE CLASS OF 1928 OF MESSICK HIGH SCHOOL 

The loss of our friend and classmate, Jack Brister, is keenly felt by us all. Jack 
proved to be one of the most valuable students of Messick School. He brought to his 
work a bright mind, a kind and obliging spirit, and an attitude of loyalty and efficiency 
for which he was greatly admired. 

The sudden death that ended his promising life was a shock to us all. 

In his life he combined those rare qualities of scholarship and high minded com- 
radeship that endeared him to everyone. 

In his departure the Seniors of '28 have a vacancy in their ranks that can never 
be filled. The entire school shares in the loss of its beloved pupil. 

The Class of '2<S extends its deepest sympathy to his family, especially to his 
father, mother, and sister, who so fondly loved him. 



hi Memory 

of 

JOHN WILLARD KRISTER, }\l 

June i }, rgi2-September 50, 1927 





"We who must grow old and staid, 

Full of caution and afraid, 

Will 111 our hearts, like flowers, keep 

Your imam', till we also sleep." 



• ' 'IPfPIMF- - 




"■■••■*$ 





(Contents 



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i. CAMPUS VIEWS 

2. THE ADMINISTRATION 

3- THE CLASSES 

4- ATHLETICS 

5. ORGANIZATIONS 

6. EEATURES 

7. HUMOR 




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24 





.■■ • 



P. T.. Armstrong, A.B., A.M. 
Mat/iematii s 



L. C. Austin, B.S., A.M. 

Mlts'li 




Denver E. Baughan, A.B., A.M. 

English 







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' 



''■'V 



Alice M. Chappell, B.S., A.M. 
Home Economics 



--. 





Annie Mai C'oki:, B.S. 
Biology 



Susie Cooper A.B., B.S. 

Spams// 





Zacii Curlin, B.A. LL.B. 
Physical Education 



William G. Deen, B.S., A.M. 

Education 



26 



- 




Jerr-5 C. Fitch, B.S.A., M.S.A. 
. It/in ulture 




Elmer B. Gift, A.B., A.M. 

Principal of Training School 

Director <if Teacher Training 





Bess L. Henderson, B.S., A.M. 
Home Economics 



Owen R. Hughes, A.B., A.M. 

Dean, Education 



27 




• ■''■'■ \%' 




, 



R. W. Johnson, B.S., A.M. 
Geography 



Leo LindseYj B.S. 
Physical Education 





Evelyn Love, B.S., A.M. 
History 



Marie McCormack 
Art and Penmanship 



28 





Alma Mays, A.B., A.M. 
English 



Eunice Meadows, A.M., A.M. 

Emj I is// 





. 




Mary Nash, B.S., A.M. 
Elementary Education 



W. H. Pleasants, A.B. 
Industrial .his 



29 





D. J. Savage, A.B., M.S. 
English 



S. E. Scates, A.B., B.S., A.M. 
History 





Nellie Angel Smith, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 



A. Lloyd Taylor, B.S., A.M. Ph.D. 
Science 



\" 





Mary P. Thomas, A.M. 
Modern Language 



Mrs. T. K. Harper 
Matron Girls' Dormitory 





Mrs. R. W. Johnson 
Assistant Librarian 



O. H. Jones 
Bursar 



3i 





Mrs. E. M. Leslie 
Sec r clary to President 



Mrs. S. A. Mynders 
Librarian 



. ■'.'.■ , 




Lizzie Norment 
Housekeeper 





* 



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J. M. Smith 
Head Men's Dormitory 



32 




Mary Abels, H.S., A.M. 

English and Geography, 

Junior High 




Jot W. Austin, B.S. 
Assistant Principal 

Musk and Manual Training 




Jou n \ ^ i Bandi , B.S. 
Second and Third Grades 




Olga Barnard, B.S. 
Fourth Grade 






Mary Dunn 
Second Grade 



[onnie Slough Bell, A.B., A.M. 
Fourth Grade 



Thelma Baughan, B.S. 
Fifth Grade 






Eva M. Fulcher, B.S. 
Sixth Grade 



Virginia Hunt, B.S. 
English, Junior High 



Fnl DINE R. JACKSON, A.B. 
Fifth Grade 




R. M. Robinson, A.B. 
History, .tumor High 






Edna Schul, A.B., A.M. 
Mathematics, Junior High 



Elizabeth Barron, B.S. 
First Grade 



Gladys Simpson, A.B. 
First Grade 



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LITERARY LADY 



5MI0US BUSINESS 



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37 













AUGUSTUS DUCK, Parsons, Tenn President 

History, English, Geography 
President Forum Debating Society, '2ti 
President World Affairs Club, '26 
Treasurer World Affairs Club. '27 
Parnassian Club 
I titer-* iollegiate I lebaters, '27 
Presidenl Phi Lambda I lelta, '28 



ALMA BRIGHT, Nashville, Tenn.. 
Home Economics, Science, History 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
V. vV. C. A. Cabinet, '26 
President [oka Wilcewan Club, '26 
Foreign Language Club, '26 
Science Club, '26 



.Secretary 



li. C. DAILEY, Parsons, Term.. Vice-President 

History, English 

President Forum Debating Society, '27 
Vice-Presideni Forum Debating Society, '24-'2."i 
Secretary Phi Lambda Delta, '28 
Treasurer, X. Y. Z. Club, '27 
Vice-President Parnassian Club, '27. '28 
Vice-President World Affairs Club, '27 
Manual Ails Club, '2.'. 

RUTH JAMES, Bells, Tenn Treasurer 

English, Languages 
Kappa Lambda Sisma 
Parnassian Club 

World Affairs Club 

Vioe-I 'resident Latin Club, '27 

Orchestra, '26-'27 

Music Club 

Literary Editor of DeSoto, '28 



?X 









'. 



Louise Acrre Hernando, Miss. 

History, English 
Vice-Pr.sident Kappa Lambda Sigma, '28 
Art Editor Desoto, '28 
Latin Club, '24 
World Affairs Club '27 
V. W. C. A. '26 



Rosamond Allen .... Memphis, Term. 



English, History 

Sigma Alpha Mu 
Parnassian Club 
Latin Club, '23 
Elementary Council, '26 




Laura Beasley .... Memphis, Tenn. 

History, English 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 




39 




Myrtle Boehm .... Memphis, Tenn. 

History, English 

President Elementary Council, '26 
Vice-President World Affairs Club, '26 



Lillian Briney .... Memphis, Tenn. 

English, History 

Sigma Alpha Mu 
Elementary Council, '25 
















Mary Buforp .... Millington, Tenn. 

Home Economics, History 

\'ice-President Sigma Alpha Mu '26 



ii 



40 



R. P. Clark Paris, Term. 

Mathematics, Languages 
Most Valuable Student 
Assistant Editor DcSoto, '28 
President Phi Lambda Helta, '27 
X. V. Z. Club 
Latin Club 



I.MRA COTTRELL . . . Holly Springs, Miss. 

English, Histon 
President Student Council, '27 
World Affairs Club 
V. W. C. A. 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 




Arvil O. Dowdy Milan, Tenn. 

Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology 
Business Manager DeSoto, '28 
Phi Lambda Delta 
President X. Y. Z. Club, '28 
Science Club 











+ ' 













Fredericks Duttlinger . Memphis, Tenn. 
History, English, Geography 
Treasurer Sigma Alpha Mu, '27 
Latin Club 
Parnassian Club 
World Affairs Club 




Elizabeth Fitzgibbon Ellis... Memphis, Tenn. 

English, Biology 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
X. V. Z. Club 




RoxiE Gaulding .... Memphis, Tenn. 
English, History 
Most Valuable Co-ed 
Pianist Glee Club, '24, '26 
Secretary Sigma Alpha Mu, '25 
Latin Club, '25 

Vice-President Sigma Alpha Mu, '25 
President Sigma Alpha Mu, '26, '27 
Pianist Orchestra, '27 
Music Club 

Secretary World Affairs Club, '27 
President Parnassian Club '27, '28 
Editor in Chief DeSoto, '28 



. * : ! 



42 















Martyn Hayes .... Memphis, Tenn. 

History, English 
President World Affairs Club, '27 




Helen Hines Memphis, Tenn. 

Home Economics, English 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Home Economics Club, '26 
Captain Basketball Team, '26 
Student Council, '26 







Clinton Humphreys . . . Cordova, Tenn. 

Science, English, Agriculture 
X. V. Z. Club 
Chemistry Club, '2i> 
Agriculture Club, '26 
Dramatic Club, '27 







43 







John - II all Jacobs . . . Middleton, Tenn. 

English, History 
Treasurer S. A. M., '26 
President S. A. M, '28 
Debating Club 
Parnassian Club, '26 
Editor of Columns, '27-'!$ 



: 




r 



Paul Morris .... Milledgeville, Tenn. 

History, English, Biology 
Vice-President Forum Debating Society, '24 
President Forum Debating Society, '24 
Foot Hall "N", '24 
Phi Lambda Delta 
World Affairs Club 
Assistant Editor Columns '27-'28 
Advertising Manager DeSoto '28 




Laeta Perkins .... Memphis, Tenn. 

English, French, History 
Kappa Lambda Sigma, '26 
Latin Club, '26 
Los Picaros Espanoles 
World Affairs Club 



44 



Ruth Povveli Memphis, Tenn. 

Home Economics, Modern Language 
Vice-President Sigma Alpha Mil, '26 
Vice.-President League of Women Voters, '26 




Elizabeth Ryan .... Memphis, Tenn. 

English, History, French 
Sigma Alpha Mu 
Orchestra 
Glee Club 
Music Club 

"The Bells of Beaujolais", '26 
Spanish Club 




Edna Mary Scarborough . Raleigh, Tenn. 

English, Geography 

Charter Member Elementary Council 




4 ; . 
















Avva May Simonton 



Memphis, Tcnn. 



English, Mathematics 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 




Ethel Talley Memphis, Tenn. 

Geography, English 
Corresponding Secretary World Affairs Club 

I 




Mai;i Yancy Lucy, Tenn 

History, English 
Sigma Alpha Mu 
World Affairs Club 



46 



I 




3UMI0R 



\- 






, 









, 



: 






JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Josepiiim Gerard, Memphis President 

Jack Morion, Williston Vice-President 

Mary Barry, Memphis Secretary 

W. B. Reeves, Hornheak Treasurer 



48 









Alice Beddingfield 
Howard Bright . . 
Letha Irene Bryan 



Covington 

Nashville 
Eads 



Josephine Burnette 
Elizabeth Chambers 



Memphis 
Dyersburg 









■ 

[1 / .,- 

Frances Chambers Dyersburg 

Jean Craig Collierville 

Melda Crosthwaite Newbern 





Clausen Dowdy Milan 

Rosalie Dunagan Memphis 



49 




Maie Fife . . . . 
Ernest Grisham . . 
Maggie Belle Little 



Bell. 

Memphis 

Brunswick 



Ellen Latting . . 
Mary McClanahan 



Lenow 
Braden 




Troy 
Memphis 




Ora Webb Memphis 

Louis Welsh Decaturville 

Glenn Williams , Troy 

Hazel Wynne Coldwater, Miss. 

Dorothy Wood Memphis 



=>' 




SnnoAMt 















John Oldham 
Helen - Neely . 
Lawrence Dukf 
Henry Facobs . 



. . President 
Vice-President 

. . Secretary 
. . Treasurer 



S4 







Evelyn Davis 
Ben Dent 
Oline Dorris 
Henry B. Evans 



Ophelia Gaulding 

Margaret Green- 
Reuben Haney 
Mamie W. Harpole 



' 












Virginia Anderson 
Lillian Askew 
Z. D. Atkins 
H. T. Ballard 





■ 



Flora Hart 
Mildred Henley 
Clara Herbert 
Vera Hoover 









" 







Joseph Koch 
Lacy Lassiter 
Martha Locker 
John Long 



Virginia Beaver 
Helen Bickford 
Nellie Blevins 
Beulah Boai.s 







■ its 



, :f ': : 



Charlotte Love 
Fred Mangrum 
Paul Miller 
Doris Mitchell 



Ralph Moose 
Mildred Moss 
Ryals Jones 
Edward King 



56 




'-..■■■ ■ ■ ■ 




Clyde Hudson- 
Eva James 
Helen Prati 
Pail Rochelle 



Audrey Sanders 
Mary Skinner 
Jack Stevens 
Bessie Strong 





P5rtf v«|?f* 



Melvin Sturcis 
Maggie L. Sudrerry 
Waddie C. Viar 
Mary Wainwright 



•#X"» 



Bueori) Wallace 

HuGHOLENE WELLS 

Ruth Abraham 
Hester F. Anderson 



57 







Pleas Fisher 
Sara King 
Cornelia Lassiter 



Martha Pirtle 
Elizabeth Ritchie 
William Clements 
Lyle Smith 



58 




Sv 







. ■ . • . ■ ' 

- '• ' " - ...'., .. 

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

Kino Johnson President 

Sam Johnson Vice-President 

Della Gwynne Webb Secretary 

James Graham Treasurer 



.,,, 




FRESHMAN ROLL 



Adams, Mary 
Aden, Mary 
Albert, Joseph 
Alexander, Cyndia 
Arnold, Sarah 
Aycock, Letitia 
Baird, Ellen 
Basham, Elsie 
Bass, Margaret 
Beeler, Louisa 
Bell, Rebekah 
Benham, Bessie 
Bennet, Irene 
Blevins, Mary 
Boals, Beulah 
Boyd, Geraldine 
Brewer, Gladys 
Briggs, Alton 
Bright, Mamie Lou 
Bromme, Elizabeth 
Brumfield, Josephine 
Bryan, Nellie 
Campbell, Mary Gladys 
Carter, Nelle 



Clark, Harriet 
Clayton, R. I). 
Clutts, Eva 
Cobb, Oliver 
Compton, Laura 
Cooper, Muriel 
Coppedge, Elizabeth 
Cowan, Catherine 
Cox, Ladye 
Crews, Elizabeth 
Cunningham, Earline 
Cunningham, Laura 
Curnutte, Geneva 
Dancer, J. W. 
Davidson, Edith 
Davis, Dorothy 
Davis, Luda 
Detchen, Floyd 
Dixon, Ora 
Downs, Frances 
Drake, Laura 
D re wry, Fred 
Droke, James 
Duffey, Nellie 



Eason, Virginia 
Edmonston, W. J. 
Edwards, Ruth 
Eppes, Nellie 
Evans, Myra Jane 
Faulkner, Jennie 
Ferguson, James 
Fife, Johnnie 
Fisher, Pearl 
Fleming, Margaret 
Flinn, Sara 
Ford, Bunice 
Foster, Lynwood 
Fransioli, Katherine 
Fulcher, Gladys 
Fulghum, Bernard 
Fumbanks, Sue 
Gardner, Elizabeth 
Garner, Edwin 
Garner, Inez 
George, Edna 
Gift, Wentworth 
Glenn, Elizabeth 



61 




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■ /■ 



FRESHMAN ROLL— Continued 



Gough, Josephine 
Gowen, Mary 
Graham, Elizabeth 
Graham, James 
(irammar, Thomas 
Halford, Guv 
Haney, Harold 
Hankins, J. C. 
Hanna, Katherine 
Hargett, Velora 
Harrison, Nina 
Harwell, Mildred 
Hatcher, Martha 
Henderson, Lucile 
Hensley, Cordy 
Herbert, Charles 
Hogue, Eugene 
Holland, Elva 
Holland, Ivy 
Hoi ley, Reed 
Horton, Robert 
Howell, Clara 
Howell, O'Neil 



Humphries, Camil 
Hunter, Rachel 
Hurley, Li Hie 
James, Ira 
Johnson, Elizabeth 
Johnson, King 
Johnson, Sam 
Johnson, Virginia 
Jones, Corinne 
Jordon, Floy 
Kee, James 
Kenney, James 
King, Kathlyne 
Kirkland, Venie 
Knight, Dorothea 
Koch, Joseph 
Land, Wade 
Lee, Lilee 
Leigh, James 
Leigh, Joseph 
Lett, Howard 
Lewis, Cary 
Lloyd, Claudine 



Long, Emma 
Lowe, Donna Sue 
McAlexander, Maggie Lee 
McAllister, Evelyn 
McQueen, Liddia 
McQuiston, Margaret 
Maddox, Josephine 
Mann, Ida Pearl 
Manning, Adele 
Marley, Mary 
Marshall, Eunice 
Marshall, Ruth 
Mauldin, Margaret 
Mays, Helen 
Miller, Andy 
Mitchell, Joe 
Moore, Julia 
Moore, Velva 
Morris, Mineola 
Morris, Rose 
Morton, Irene 
Morton, Nina 
Nelms, Martha 



tyi 




FRESHMAN ROLL— Continued 



Nunnery, Louise 
Nute, Lewis 
O'Daniel, Maxie 
Olson, Vivian 
Overby, Dovie 
Owen, l T na 
Parker, Cora 
Perry, Jesse 
Phebus, Mary 
Pifcr, Alice 
Piper, Elizabeth 
Pitman, Virginia 
Porter, Robert 
Powell, Pearl 
Privette, Mary Bess 
Pugh, Evelyn 
Reaves, Dixie 
Reeves, Dale 
Reid, Katherine 
Rhea, James 
Rives, Mae Belle 
Roberts, Dollie 
Roberts, Willie 
Rook, Sarah 
Rymer, Barbara 
Sasser, Mary 
Scrivener, Marion 



Sherrill, Bernice 
Shultz, Mary 
Simon, Lena Mae 
Sisco, Nelle 
Stafford, Sara 
Stanley, Faye 
Steere, Frances 
Storck, Philip 
Strong, Ada 
Suggs, Mary A. 
Suggs, Mary Q. 
Sullivan, Murray 
Summers, Louis 
Swearingen, Robert 
Swearingen, ,Marv 
Tarrant, Christine 
Tate, Chester 
Taylor, Gaston 
Taylor, Mabel 
Tennant, Sadie 
Thomas, Emily 
Thomas, Elizabeth 
Thomas, Sam 
Thompson, Edward 
Thompson, Laverne 
Thompson, Mary 
Trudel, Elizabeth 



Trudel, Rudolph 
Fucker, Lawrence 
Turner, Emma 
Turner, Martha 
Vaughan, Virginia 
Vineyard, Lina 
Wade, Bertha 
Wainwright, Fiances 
Walker, James 
Walker, Jessie 
Wallace, Hazel 
Wallace, Lois 
Waller, Haywood 
Ware, Elizabeth 
Webb, Delia Gwynne 
Weeks, Bruce 
Welsh, Mary 
Wesson, Madelyn 
White, Martha 
Wiley, Grace 
Wilkinson, Earl 
Williams, Guy 
Williams, Grady 
Wilson, Winnie 
Winston, C. S. 
Wright, Myrlee 
Young, Mabel 



63 



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LA. 



^ 




Back Rotv — Left to Right: Shea, Waller, Holly, Moose, Long, McQuiston, Thompson. Asst. 
Coach King, Head Coach Zach Curlin, Asst. Coach McLaughlin, 

Middle Roiv — Left to Rig/it: Mayo, Jones, Tucker, Fisher, James, Droke, Graham, Winfrey, 
Tarver, Schneider, Robertson, Phetteplace. 

Front Roiv — Left to Right: Kennedy, Koch, Grisham, Johnson, Porter, Captain Crawford, 
Rochelle, Headden, Fulghum, McAlpin, Bullington. 



CAPTAIN GRAHAM CRAWFORD 

"A very versatile player," is a good description of Crawford. An ideal captain 
who set a playing standard that his men could work to equal. A backfield man by 
choice, he played in the line when the opposition was to be halted. Crawford will be 
missed next season. 



CAPTAIN-ELECT HARMON "SLICK" HEADDEN 

"Slick" played that 'ole wing position last season and he was hard to hold. "Slick" 
played heads up and kept his teammates "up and at 'em". When backs tried to circle 
his end he put the "caduvius" on 'em. We expect lots from him in '28-'29. 



CAPTAIN -ELECT JOE KOCH 

Joe sure knifed through to get his man behind the line. Joe was at center and 
h-s addage and practice was, "they shall not pass". With Joe back next year we feel 
"fixed" at center. "Slick" and Joe — what a pair! 



hh 



FOOTBALL 



Dear Rox: 



Did they tell you bout that team we had in 1927? Well, we gave all the wise 
acres something to talk about right from the beginning. You know, every year there 
is one game that the Teachers just have to win — the game with a bunch o' guys they 
call the Lynx-Cats. We sure had 'em scared and it looked bad tor them. But I'm 
'way ahead of my story. 

After all this talk, the Tigers got started and played a bunch o' guys from Jones- 
boro College. It ended mighty bad for them 'cause we quit playing after making 48 
tallies and they had made nary a one. It ended the same way when we played Will 
May field, only we were more gentle hosts to them. We just made seven points. 
They made the same number as Jonesboro. Delta State Teachers were next and 
they went the way of the other two. They made 'none' points — we made 21. 

Well, talk was running high. Them Cats were sure scared. Next we went to 
Murfreesboro to play a bunch of 'pros'. For one quarter we were all over the field 
but something went wrong — well, I "rather not hear no more bout that". 

Bethel came next and they went the way of the conquered, 27 to 13. So did 
Lambuth — say Rox, that sure is a "crabby" gang of Preachers. They think they 
ought to be given everything 'cept the platter. To end up quick — we did, beat 'em 
20 to 7 and kept the platter. 

Rox, there is a fellow that they call Swartz, 'cause that's his name. He's a 
clever fellow. Nothing can go wrong if you are to be entertained in his home town. 
Well, he knew a man named Meriweather and we didn't, so we got six points and 
they got nine. Don't tell nobody. 

Well, these kittens from Southwestern were trembling by this time. But some 
sort of 'ology seems to come over Teachers' teams when they play these goofs. We 
just couldn't do no good with one touchdown when they got several — four to be exact 
with three extra points they gives when 'er man boots the ball 'tween them posts. 

We ended the season in fine fashion, though, for we took on the Pedagogues at 
Murray, Kentucky. They were the biggest guys I ever saw and it looked bad for us 
but we played a little "boy" who found a ball rolling 'round when somebody oughta 
had it so he picked it up and with "Plutonic" effect went for the necessary touchdown 
to add up 14 points — same as them. 

Next year, though we are going to have a new gymn and plenty "backing" with 
the same coach and two Captains. Rox, I sure do hate to think how these other teams 
are going to look against the West Tennessee Teachers' College, Memphis, Tennessee, 
in 1928-29. 

'Til we beat everybody, so-long, 

WILLIE. 



67 




Back Roiv—Left to Right: Gaulding, Bell. 

Middle Row— Left to Right: Harpole, Thompson, Wood. 

Front Row— Left to Right: 11, .over, Skinner, Moody, Baird, Tucker. 



CAPTAIN DOROTHY WOOD 

"Dot" is without doubt the fastest side-center in "seven" .states. When Ophelia 
Rot the tip-off "Dot" was the next "man" on the ball. "Plenty nice", Dot, "they'll 
have to go some to get a better successor." How 'bout next year's champs? 



68 



T 



Rox: 



I'm about to relate a sweet story to you 'bout how several girls — six most of the 
time — completely mesmerized, pulverized, and "consuviated the piazzazzo" of all the 
teams in this here territory, which all means, we defeated them all once or more times. 
There is also a coach that "helped" to put all these wins across and that made seven 
girls. How can six ever beat seven? We had all the others beat to begin with. 

There are too many wins to tell you about specially so I'll just tell you the best. 

Two teams we were after, Delta State Teachers and Ole Miss. It sure did 
make my bones rattle with glee to see that big bunch go down when "Squeeky" aiul 
Mattie Wood got right. They flung them goals plenty full. They had plenty help 
too with 'Phelius, Dot, Skinner and the others carpeting their material. Know what 
I mean? Well, we won easy. 

Ole Miss came up here with "Old Blood and Thunder", but she looked like all 
the rest to our Twin-Six so Ole Miss lost, too. 

Rox, there wasn't a thing in Memphis that could hold a light to our girls. All 
these "fast" teams looked mighty slow when we played 'em and that tells the whole 
story. Here is how the season ended and also follows a list of our laurels — City 
Champs, Tri-State Champs, Mississippi Valley Conference Champs, World's Free 
Throw Champs (team) and Ellen Hand, our forward, is World Free Throw Cham- 
pion. Some stuff. What have you we ain't got? 

Still loud in their praise, 

WILLIE. 



P. S. Rox, we played in the National Invitational Tournament at Wichita, 
Kansas, and for us, our girls were winners though they didn't get the big cup. They 
beat some big team 42 to something, I forget the rest. 

P. P. S. Southwestern had a girls team but that didn't change things for us 'er 
bit. We had two good practice sessions — they called the third off. Ha! Ha! 

That's All for This Year, 
STILL WILLIE. 



69 




ELLEN BA1RI) 

World's free-throw champion, senior j^irls division, with a score of sixty shots out of a possi- 
ble sixty. 









70 




BASKETBALL 



Rox, Ole Thing: 

We had a team whut was composed of five men and had a ball that they threw at 

a basket — and put it in lots too — that turned out some excitement. We played all the 
good teams around here and won most of the time. 

Started the season off beating Delta State Teachers 66 to 6. Too bad. Well, 
we had a mishap 'bout that time and lost over half our team whut started out. 
Coach Zach worked 'em hard though and got some more men and stayed in there and 
fought 'em. Well, that same ology or mania came over us against them Lynx-Cats 
and we just couldn't beat 'em. Two other teams in town we couldn't triumph — big 
word — over either. They were the. Elks Club and the "Y" Triangles. You know, 
we joined a Conference and went to play in that tournament they held at Jonesboro. 
We went tripping along to the finals when we played some team — Junior Vols from 
Martin, Tenn. They won, after we had led in scoring up to the last, 47 to 37. 
Sure was hard but they were plenty good. Two Irishman — Mc and Mc — got to- 
gether and scored, too, too many times. They couldn't out-fight a team like "Slick" 
and his gang though. Rox, just read next year and know how we sunk 'em, everyone. 

See you when we "fill that basket full", 

WILLIE. 

71 




The Sophomore t;irls won the Inter-Class Tournam: nt by defeating the Freshmen and Junior 
sextettes twice. The }^i r K had a fast six with good pass work. 

Standing — Left In Riglit: Ophelia Gaulding, Matti/ Wood Harpole, Vera Hoover, Lillian 
Tucker, Genola Cunningham, Mary Skinner. Martha Pirtle, steady forward, who rn ant much 
in the Sophomore victory, is not in the picture. 



BASEBALL 

Dear Rox: 

We got a "sweet" ball club. Odus is still flinging along with Jack Stevens. Ole 
Slick is pitching and playing first when he ain't ("Steve" holds first down when be 
doe.s) and "Ferg" (Jim Ferguson) is down here with us and doing his stuff. We 
got "Milt" on second, "Rabbitt" on short, "Andy" on third, and Lilley and Herbert 
tatching — sometimes one, sometimes the other. Spence got here too late so he can't 
play 'til next six weeks. In outfield "Dubb" is in right, "Willie" in center and Odus 
and "Ferg" alternates in left. When one is pitching the other plays, when they don't 
( )dus plays and hits fer himself. "Eddie" Edwards is going good. All these fellows 
play when they are playing good. Southwestern is next. 

T ell you how it all come out when 1 see you, 

- WILLIE. 



72 







73 







..... 



neeirs 

FALL QUARTER 

Frances Chambers President 

Elizabeth Arnette Vice-President 

Josephine Burnette Secretary 

Dorothy Wood Treasurer 

WINTER QUARTER 

Josephine Burnette President 

Louise Acree Vice-President 

Hazel Wynne Secretary 

Alice Beddingfield Treasurer 

Elizabeth Arnette Critic 

Ruth Abraham Reporter 

SPRING QUARTER 

Eunice Marshal! President 

Ruth James Vice-President 

Dorothy Wood Secretary 

Mary- Skinner Treasurer 

Elizabeth Arnette Critic 

Ruth Abraham Reporter 

74 






KAPPA 
LAMBDA 

SIGMA 






Bright, Crosthwaite, Ellis, Beasley, Stanley, Edwards, Gardner, Pittman, McDow, 

Robinson, Chambers, McClanahan, Anderson. 



75 





ir 





KAPPA 

LAMBDA 

SIGMA 




Hoover, Holland, Cottrell, James, Bryan, Crosthwaite, Lassiter, Boals, Stafford, 
Lassiter, Tucker, Thompson, Evans. 

76 




BRAIDS 




.„ 



O. 



o 



* 



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$5 



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o 



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DIONITV 



77 




7« 



Signia Alpha Mu 




FOUNDED 1912 AT WEST TENNESSEE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Motto: Semper Fidelis 



Colors: Red and White 



Flower: Red Carnation 



Lillian Briney 
Mary Buford 



1928 

Fredericka Duttlinger 
Roxie Gaulding 
Ruth Powell 



Elizabeth Ryan 
Mary Yancy 



Mary Barry 
Lady Lee Branch 
Eda Rav Brooks 



1929 

Jean Craig 
Rosalie Dunagan 
Josephine Gerard 
Ellen Latting 



Bess Oftert 
Isabell Utz 
Ora Webb 



Hester Anderson 
Lillian Askew 
Rebekah Bell 
Evelyn Davis 
Mamie Davis 
Thelma Gardner 
Ophelia Gaulding 
Annyce Griffis 
Mattie Wood Harpole 



1930 

Flora Hart 
Clara Herbert 
Myrtle Hodges 
Nannie M. Holden 
Evelyn Humphries 
Martha Locker 
Charlotte Love 
Frances Mason 
Evelyn Morton 
Mildred Moss 



Helen Neely 
Martha Pirtle 
Effie Porter 
Mary Short 
Louise Simpson 
Bessie Strong 
Mary Wainwright 
Hugolene Wells 
Anola Welsh 



Cyndia Alexander 
Letitia Aycock 
Elizabeth Bromme 
Mary Gladys Campbell 
Nelle Carter 
Elizabeth Coppedge 
Ladye Cox 
Dorothy Davis 
Luda Davis 



1931 

Lucille Dixon 
Nellie Duffy 
Sarah Flinn 
Josephine Gough 
Katherine Hanna 
Ida Pearl Mann 
Marguerite Mauldin 
Julia Moore 
Irene Morton 
Louise Nunnerv 



Cora Parker 
Elizabeth Piper 
Ada Strong 
Mary Suggs 
Elizabeth Thomas 
Frances Wainwright 
Jessie Walker 
Delia Gwynne Webb 
Mabel Young 



Annie Mae Coke 
Mrs. T. K. Harper 



In Faculty 

Bess L. Henderson 
Evelvn Love 



Marie McCormack 
Mrs. S. A. Mvnders 



70 




Mother M\ nders 



x,, 



Seymour A* XVf ymdets Club 

FOUNDED 1913 

Motto: "Nil nisi bonum" 
C01 cms: Green and White Flower: Whitt (.'atnaliot 

Founders 

Carlisle Hcrrnn Wells Shearer J°hn George 



ROLL 

Class of 1928 

John Hall Jacobs 

Class of 1929 

Ernest Grisham 
Buford Wallace 
Paul Miller 
Odus Walker 
Harmon Headden 
Andy Colcbanks 

Class of 1930 

John Long, Jr. 
Eug'ne Fulghum 
Henry Jacobs 
Edward M. Kiny 
Joe Koch 
Joe Dungan 
Lawrence Puke 
Paul Rochelle 
John P. Storck 
Maurice Haste 
Z. D. Atkins 
Dale Reeves 

Class 01 1931 

Guy Hal ford 
James Graham 
Thomas Herbert 
Sam Johnson 
Joe Mitchell 
King Johnson 

Pledges 

Claude McAlpin 
William Edmondston 
Justin Pitts 
Andy Miller 
Louis Summers 
H. T. Ballard 
Charles Winston 
Oliver P. Cobb, Jr. 







82 



; 







#'■ 



MOLLY AND ME AND BABY 
MAKES THREE 



K 



THE HOLDUP 



JUST SAM AND JIM 




cJ^ ^ 




RATS 



PAYING OFF 



. 



83 



Phi Lambda Delta 



FOUNDED AT WEST TENNESSEE 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 1927 



Howard Bright, '29 
R. P. Clark, '28 
Wm. Clement, '30 
S. Cunningham, '30 

B. C. Dailey, '28 
A. O. Dowdy, '28 

C. H. Dowdy, '29 
Tames Droke, '31 
A. L. Duck, '28 




MEMBER IN FACULTY 
D. E. Baughan 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Henry B. Evans, '30 
Pleas Fisher, '29 
Harold Haney, '31 
Reuben Haney, '30 
Reeder Holley, '31 
Robert Horton, '31 
Jack Houston, '29 
Clyde Hudson, '30 
Ryals Jones, '30 



W. B. Jones, '29 
Robert Kendall, 
Joe Leigh, '29 
Fred Mangrum, 
Ralph Moose, '30 
Paul Morris, '28 
Lyle Smith, '30 
Jack Stevens, '30 
J. B. Stricklin, '30 
Bruce Sturgis, '29 



Melvin Sturgis, '30 
30 Gaston Taylor, '31 

Ed. Thompson, '3 1 
30 ( Maude Turner, '28 

E. V. Underbill, '27 
YV. C. Viar, '30 
Louis Welsh, '29 
R. E. White, '30 
Glen Williams, '29 







President 

Clark 

Duck 
Duck 



OFFICERS 
FALL QUARTER 
Vice-President Secretary 

Dowdy Smith 

WINTER QUARTER 
Hudson Dailey 

SPRING QUARTER 
Haney Bright 

84 



Treasurer 

Bright 

Dowdy 
Thompson 




85 





OUO.. DEMOSTHENES 



ROMANCE- NUPP GRID 



tlPHIS Gl£.\i.\G \PPEAt,. MEMPHIS. T#<\:\; M IfiUl 2-, /92 




T14E MODERN WEBSTER 




A RAT ON LAUNDRY DAY 



*$■ '* i- Kill 




5WINE'EM UP BAT RABBIT 



'CINCINNATI OUR. ENGINEER. IN ACTION 



AN IRRESPONSIBLE GANG 






LORDRASPBERRY&COMPANY . 




■"*«5affi|, gSS^^ 



, ^P- 




BUMS FROM DECATUR COUNTY 



STAKS THAT BLOOM IN THE SPRING 





WHEN DUB WITS A ¥AN HE STAYS PUT 



SPRINGTIME AND- 



■ 



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Parnassian Club 






Roxie Gaulding 
President 



Berdie Dailey 
Vice-President 



Ruth Abraham 
Secretary 



', ' -' 



■ . 











Baughak 
Duck 



James 
Barky 



Gaulding 
Allen 



( )i diiam 
Duttlinger 



87 






•-■ ?> 



' • • ^fttSSP 1 







BeRDIE Dailey 
President 



Ruth James Josephine Burnette Melda Crosthwahv: 

Vice-President Secretary Treasurer 



The World Affairs Club represents student initiative, enterprise, and organization in th. j 
social sciences. Its purpose is to promote research in international problems of to-day. 

The Club is limited to (hirtv members and meets fortnightly. Organized in 1926, it has be- 
come one of the solid student organizations of the college. Three series of problems have been 
investigated during the current year: The Danger Spots of the World, The Ris^ and Dismem- 
berment of the Russian Empire, and Germany since the World War. 






Maimi s Mayes 
President 



Berdie Daile\ 



Ruby Wert, 





• "> "^ ii" 



Ethel Talley 



' ; > . 



Treasurer 



Vice-President Recording Secretary Corresponding Scry. (Ins Duck 



;•;:-; 





v \, Ik .. 





c \Ydyld^4ffatrs . 







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$ 



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8 9 



Latin Club 




J 



Virginia Anderson 
Beulah Boals 
Melda Crosthwaite 
R. P. Clark 
Jean Craig 
Fredericka Duttlinger 
Maie Fife 
Pauline Grammar 
Margaret Gavin 
Ophelia Gaulding 
Elease Hogan 
Mary Hogan 



ROSTRA 
ROMANAE REI PUBLICAE 

Martha Hatcher 
Ruth James 
James Keyes 
Homer Leigh 
Helen Livingston 
Charlotte Love 
Lacy Lassiter 
Antoinette Lovejoy 
Bernice Lovejoy 
Marguerite Mauldin 
J. T. Middleton 
Frances Mason 
Helen Neely 



Laeta Perkins 
Marion Scrivener 
Sarah Stafford 
Ada Strong 
Bessie Strong 
Elizabeth Thomas 
Mary Agnes Thomas 
Thyra Thompson 
Hazel Wallace 
Hugolene Wells 
Jessie Walker 
Martha White 



90 



TEREMTI phormio 

PERSONAE 

Prologus Ada Strong 

Davos, a slave Homer Leigh 

Geta, slave of Demipho Bessie Strong 

Antipho, son of Demipho Ophelia Gauldinc 

Phaedria, son of Chremes Antoinette Lovejoy 

Demipho, an old man Mary Barry 

Phormio, a parasite R. P. Clark 

Hegio | Pauline Grammar 

Cratinus \ Legal advisers of Demipho \ Sarah Stafford 

Crito J [ Vircinia Anderson 

Dorio, a slave dealer Charlotte Love 

Chremes, an old man, brother of Demipho Helen Neely 

Saphrona, a nurse Mary Holland 

Nausistrata, wife of Chremes Beulah Boals 

Cantor Jean Craig 




GETA 



PHORMIO 



9i 



LOS PICAR05 C5 PAN DLE5 





I.OS PICARO.S ESPAXOI.ES 

During the tall quarter there was felt among the students of Spanish the need for an organization to pro- 
mote the interest and study of Spanish in the college. 

Accordingly, early in the winter quarter there was organized what has come to be known as l.OS PICAROS 
ESPANOL13S, "The Spanish Rascals." Though the name is neither dignified nor conservative, the club has done 
some splendid work, and has set for itself some noble tasks and ideals, ehie! among which is the promotion of the 
Spanish to a four-year department, fitted to really prepare teachers for Spanish in our secondary schools. 

Some twenty-two were enrolled as charter members, and all feel • i'ti te gratified to see their wink progress- 
ing so well, .and feel assured of the position which Los Ficaros will soon come to fill in the institution. Miss 
Cooper has been of invaluable assistance to ns, and we want to express to her our thanks. Charter officers were 
J. Newton Oldham, President; Ophelia Gaulding, Vice-President; Ellen Baird, Secretary-Treasurer; Ben Dent, 
Reporter. 

1VIVAN LOS PICAROS! 

92 






ffonomicf 



^ 









■..,._-. 



loka Wikewan Club 



Alma Brighi, President 



Mary Aden 
Virginia Beaver 
Louisa Beeler 
Lady Lee Branch 
Nellie Bryan 
Mary Buford 
Eunice Ford 



Hazel Wynne, Vice-President 
Alice Beddingfield, Secretary-Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Bess L. Henderson 
Alice M. Chappell 

ROLL 



Josephine Gerard 
Aileen Griffis 
Helen Hines 
Ellen Latting 
Maggie Bell Little 
Maggie L McAlexander 

93 



Una Owen 
Mildred Moss 
Virginia Pittman 
Mary Short 
Bess Tucker 
Frances Wainwright 
He Rhoda Wingo 




i 



f* V r i 



' 



Dramatic Club 

"Persuasive speech, and more persuasive sia/is, 
Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes." 

The Dramatic Club of W. T. S. T. C, which was organized April 20, 1927, by the Fresh- 
man Class, celebrates its first anniversary this spring. The leaders in this organization were 
inspired to form this club through the lack of one, and the evident need of a dramatic club in 
this college. 

The purpose of the club is to find and to develop dramatic talent of the students. With 
this end in view, the club also purposes to stimulate an interest in dramatics among the entire 
student body. 

Lillian Askew President 

Dave Scheinberg Vice-President 

Una Owen Secretary 

Charlotte Love Treasurer 



r <] 




X. Y. Z. Club 



ROLL 



Ruth Abraham 
P. L. Armstrong 
Helen Bickford 
R. P. Clark 
A. (). Dowdy 
C. H. Dowdy 
Eugene Fulghum 
Clyde Hudson 
Clinton Humphries 
Mamie Jones 



Sarah King 
Pete Long 
Florence McDow 
Anna Key McNeil 
Fred Mangrum 
Ralph Moose 
Elizabeth Ritchie 
Paul Rochelle 
Louise Strong 
Bruce Sturgis 



•is 







ALMA 8»SH1 

UNDO. SEP, 







MA, IE F1FF 

PR. as. 



7 / 



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5KENG6 MCDOW 






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47 A 

LILLIAN f^SKEW 
W PtLUlWSHIP 




OK- smith; 

f-ACULTl ADVISER. 




BEULAH SOAt f 

SOCIAL. C£RV 




P CHAMBERS 

PUBLICITY 



96 



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Y. W. 





BLUE RIDGE 




MORNING WATCH 




C.A. 




LEADER 



SPONSOR. 




V 



SUNNING 



97 



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UP IN THE AIR. "THANKS FORTHE- BUGGY RIDE A WAGON FULL 



99 




ORCHESTRA 



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CHORI S 



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zzoiogists ! 
oniains 



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BSmI^HHOHmmBsBHHS 



ONE OF THE SOUTH'S BEST COLLEGIATE DANCE AND CONCERT ORCHESTRAS 



THE MEMPHONIANS 

This orchestra was organized in September, 1927, by Maurice Haste, who directs and man- 
ages these boys, and in its eight months of playing has enjoyed a very successful season for 
dances and programs played. All important social functions of the college found this orchestra 
furnishing their music. 

Among the outstanding dances and programs played during the year by this orchestra were: 
Freshman Dance, Reserve Officer Armistice Eve Banquet, S. A. M. Dance, Christmas DeMolay 
Dance, Maids and Matrons Ball, at Clarksdale, Mississippi; Hunt and Polo Club New Year 
Pirate Party, Non-Commissioned Officers Club Dance, S. A. M. Banquet, Tri-State DeMolay 
Conclave Dance, WMC and WREC radio concerts, concerts at Millington High School, Central 
High School, Messick High School, and Shrine luncheon. 

The members of this orchestra wish to express their appreciation to those members of the 
faculty and student body who have helped the orchestra in any of its undertakings during th? 
past season. 



102 



METHDNDME 



Mildred Moss 
Nellie Epps 
Liddia McQueen 
Thyra Thompson 



Gaston Taylor 
B u to id Wallace 
Roxie Gaulding 
Helen Bickford 




103 







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WHITfr 



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11/ Ik,' 

BARftY 



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JACOB/ 




ti AfN&Y 




NBKLY 




BAU6HAK 



INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATERS 
Edward King and R. E. White represented Teachers College against Southwestern. 

Ruth Abraham and Mary Barry debated Delta State at Cleveland while John Hall Jacobs 
and Reubn Haney met the Delta team that came to Memphis. 
as 

R. E. White, Eunice Marshall, Edward King, and Helen Neely met the debaters of Union 

University. 

Mr. D. E. Baughan is to be thanked for his splendid work as coach. 



104 



CROSTHWAIT 

SECR.ETAfl.-Y 






COTTftELL 

PRESIDENT 



BCDDINGPIELD 

V*C(5 PREStOfiNT 



Student 
Council 



V 





Mi - ^ 




•a 




I 



WYNNE 

TR.BASuR.JSR- 



BOALS 



ASKEW 





BRYAN 



JAMES 



105 



STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS, 1927-2$ 

Lura Cottrell President 

Alice Bedim ngfield lice-President 

Melda Crosthwaite Secretary 

Hazel Wynne Treasurer 



OTHER OFFICERS 

Beulah Boals 
Lillian Askew 
Irene Bryan 
Eva James 
Mamie Bright 
Helen Livingston 



Student government at W. T. S. T. C. is now considered an essential feature of college life 
and its activities. At the beginning of the fall quarter the Council was reorganized and has co- 
operated most beautifully under the supervision of the faculty advisory committee in promoting 
two aims: a higher sense of responsibility and duty toward fellow students, and a real spirit 
of cooperation between the student body and the faculty in the carrying out of such regulations 
as are deemed best in promoting the general welfare of the college. At all times the executive 
committee has for its purpose the promoting of right because it is right and has weighed very 
carefully all of the problems brought before it in this manner. 



1928-29 

Edith Davidson 
Ruth Edwards 
Maie Fife 
Bunice Ford 
Eunice Marshall 
Ruth Marshall 
Maxie O'Daniel 
Florence McDow 
Mary Forte Phoebus 
Mary Ella Simmons 



106 



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107 



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JAMES DPLOKQ 

MAN DSOMEST BOY 



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ELIZABETH CHAMBERS 

PRETTIEST -GULL 



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JAMES DRX)KE 

^I/Host pOpultVl. fotlt 



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110 




R,..p. CLAIZ^ 
'Most T/a-fuatlC. Hr&tj/ 




BEST330YATHIETE 



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The following courses, though not included in the catalogue, have been found to be very 
helpful to the student and are therefore offered every quarter. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Ed. 54-I. Q. — Psychology: This course is offered for students suffering from weak mem- 
ories. Particular emphasis will be placed on responding promptly and correctly to Mr. Deen's 
numerical roll. You will be allowed to call only one number beside your own. Students plan- 
ning to be absent should make arrangements accordingly. 

Ed. 8:15 A. M. — Psychology: The purpose of this course is to teach serious-minded students 
how to concentrate on history in the rest room. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. 
Seniors are hopeless by this time. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

English 000 — Modern Prose: Expurgated portions of the bulletin board will be read and 
discussed as to style, legibility, and influence. This course is closed to all who have any prere- 
quisites. 

English R. S. V. P. — Debating: Designed especially for those students who have had diffi- 
culty in arguing the librarian out of a book before three-thirty. 

English 99 out of 100 — Vocabulary Training. This is a lecture course given by Mr. Baughan. 
Text: Noah Webster's masterpiece. 

English 66 B. C. — Dramatics: How to chew gum without being caught. Much attention 
will be given to facial expression and voice quality. Open to French students. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

History 1492 — Biography: The lives of prominent S. T. C. students will be thoroughly 
analyzed. Everyone taking this course will be expected to contribute at least one brand new 
scandal a week. This has always proved a most popular as well as most instructive study. No 
yellow slips will be used. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Ec. 99 44/100% — Table Etiquette: Since old forms and manners are rapidly being 
replaced by more modern and efficient ones, this course has proved invaluable. Frequent field 
trips will be made to the dining hall, to Scruggs', and to adjacent pigstands in order that the 
students may have the benefit of first hand information. Prerequisite: a heathy appetite. 

Home Ec. 57 varieties — Costuming: The latest fashions in men's and women's clothing. 
Exhibits of the garments made in the laboratory will be displayed on rat days. 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Music Grrr — Chapel Singing: The purpose of this course is to teach students the accepted 
methods of community singing. Class periods come at the regular chapel time. Class procedure 
is as follows: talk to the girl on the row behind you while Mr. Austin announces the number. 
When the pianist strikes the chord, scramble around and get a book. While Mr. Austin, accom- 
panied by the piano, sings the first stanza, get the number from someone who knows it — if you 
can find such a one. Now you are ready to join in the chorus with joyous abandon, fire, vivac- 
ity, etc., but do not let your enthusiasm overcome you to the extent of keeping in time. No one 
else does, so why should you make yourself conspicuous? At the conclusion of the song allow 
the book to fall noisily to the floor. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Phys. Ed. 3. 141 6 — Sprinting: Training for dashes. Regular w : orkouts including running 
through Belt Alley and dodging old men. Open to rats and freshmen. 

Phys. Ed. P. D. Q. — Continuation of the above. Special practice in dashing for the street 
car, chasing down Mr. Jones, grabbing back seats in chapel, dodging pn.fs. whose classes you 
have cut, and bucking the line to the dining hall. This course is guaranteed to turn out bigger 
and better students: sound minds in sound bodies. 

Phys. Ed. 33.333 1/3 — Swimming: This course meets on rainy days, and until the new gym 
is completed, the front walk will be used as a pool. 

Phys. Ed. 7-1 1 — This course is designed for those who plan to take up aesthetic dancing 
after graduation. Special exercise for acquiring grace and poise include cranking the pencil 
sharpener, extracting water from the fountains, and elbowing to the mirror in the rest room. 



FEATURE PHOTOPLAYS PRESENTED AT W. T. S. T. C. 

"The Big Parade" — From the street car line to the Administration Building at 8:15 A. M. 

"Mockery" — Mr. Hughes' smile at the attempt of squirming freshmen to answer the question. 
"What is psychology"? 

"Lovers" — Starring Jack Houston and Mary Short. 

"The Phantom of the Opera" — The ghost of "The Mikado". 

"Resurrection" — The reappearance of your English notebook that took French leave. 

"The Campus Flirt" — In which Mary Buford rises to heights of stardom. 

"Twelve Miles Out" — The campus from town if you ride a Normal car. 

"The Way of All Flesh" — Yawning during Dr. Steele's lecture. 

"Naughty but Nice" — Featuring Madelyn Wesson. 

"After Midnight" — Secrets of dormitory feasts laid bare. 

"Sparrows" — Freshmen on Registration Day. 

"Safety Last" — Riding with Laeta Perkins. 

"The Road to Romance" — The walk to Mynders Hall. 



"5 



"The Freshman" — King Johnson in person. 

"The Gold Rush" — The scene of which is laid in the bursar's office. 

"The Old Nest"— The Sigma Club Room. 

"The Quart rback" — Zip! Boom! Strawberry Tucker. 

"The Magic Circle" — Mr. Austin's ct;rnal circle of scales. 

"Padlocked" — The Book store. 

"What Price Glory" — A+ in zoology. 

"Three Weeks" — What we ought to get for Christmas holidays. 

"The Unholy Three" — Duck, Daiky and Haney. 

"It" — What Mr. Savage has. 

"Metropolis" — Highland Avenue. 

"If Winter Comes" — Will there be any heat in the auditorium? 

"The Sheik" — Watch Jimmie Droke. 

"Main Street" — From Bry's to Goldsmith's. 

"To Have and tT Hold" — The plot centers around textbooks. 

"The Mcrry-Go-Round" — Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sun- 
day, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, etc., etc., etc. 

"Daddy Long Legs"— Featuring the stellar comedian, Pete Long. 

"Behind the Front" — Th^ ever-popular back seats in chapel. 

"The Ten Commandments" — 

i. Thou shalt not argue with Dr. Steere. 

2. Thou shalt not sit back of the posts in chapel. 

3. Thou shalt not be late to Mr. Deen's classes. 

4. Thou shalt not loit:r in the corridors — when Mr. Hughes is watching. 

5. Thou shalt r member that "The American Magazine" is anathema to Mr. Baughan. 

6. Thou shalt not throw paper upon the floor if Emma be near. 

7. Thou shalt not use blasphemy when Miss Coke poppeth a quiz. 

8. When thou openest thy mouth to make m:lody in chapel, thou shalt keep a beat and 
a half behind the piano. 

9. Thou shalt not attempt to enlighten an extension student, for great store of scorn and 
wrath will be thy lot. 

10. Thou shalt hate Southwestern with all thy h:art, and with all thy soul, and with all 
thy strength, and with all thy mind. 

"Beau Geste" — Replete with thrills, Sam Johnson plunging the line. 

"It Must Be Love" — John Oldham and Hugholene Wells. 

"Variety" — What chapel programs lack. 

"The Covered Wagon" — Dr. Taylor's Ford. 

"Orphans of the Storm" — Freshmen after fall exams. 



116 



AN INSPIRING CHAPEL SPEECH 

Mr. Brister: YVe have with us today a prominent business man of Memphis, a man who 
has the interests of education at heart and who was influential in bringing this institution to 
this place. It gives me a great deal of pleasure to present to you Mr. Take It Seriously. 

(Applause is expected, and so with the aid of the faculty a respectable amount of nois; greets 
the Distinguished Visitor). 

Mr. Take It Seriously: Dr. Krister, members of the faculty, and my dear young friends. 
After that flattering introduction, I am alraid that tru- few words I have to say will prove 
disappointing. 

(Students exchang meaning looks). 

Just here 1 am reminded of a stor\ that I read last week. Two Scotchmen put vip a wager 
as to which one could stav under water longest. Three davs later th;v were still searching for 
the bodies. Ha! Ha! Ha"! 

(The speaker pauses for the hearty (?) laughter to subside). 

However, I am delighted to be here and to speak to you this morning; I always enjoy 
speaking to an audience of the superior type that you represent. 

(Where have we heard that before?) 

My dear young friends, as I look into your bright young faces, I am moved to say to you: 
"You are going out to be the teachers of tomorrow. I say in all sincerity that you are the most 
important people in the world ; yours is the noblest profession on the face of God's green earth. 
You will have great opportunities to serve your fellow man, for, although the financial remune- 
ration may not be in proportion to your worth, your influence will live in the lives of the count- 
less children with whom you will come in contact, and your highest aim must always be service, 
because it is only in serving one's fellow man and in being of benefit to humanity that one's life 
is successful in the highest sense of the word, for 1 say unto you that success is not to be meas- 
ured in terms of dollars and cents but in urms of service to humanity. 

My dear young friends, I can tell by your interested faces ( !) that you are realize the value 
of an education, but to make the thing more definite I am going to give you some statistics com- 
piled in 1898 by the Bureau for the Propagation of Unintelligible Information. The man who 
knows only the A B C's has one-nin.ty-eighth of a chance out of five thousand to rise to the 
position of third assistant to the associate stamp-licker in a federal post office. Going a little 
farther up the scale, we find that the man who has been to school long enough to recite ths 
multiplication table backwards has two chances to get to this place. The man who has gone 
through the seventh grade may count on ten and one-fifteenth chances. Coming still farther on, 
the one who has gone far enough to know the second meaning of the word "pony" has fifty-nine 
chances. You can see from these illuminating figures the unlimited opportunities that crowd 
upon the graduates from our institutions of higher learning. But above all things, my dear 
young friends, there is one thing that must not be forgotten. You will n.ver be able to render 
service to your fellow man unless you have character. Character is the only sure basis of a 
truly serviceable life, and when you come to leave this world, nothing will count except character. 
I thank you. 

(Applause led by Mr. Deen, who has preserved an air of intense interest throughout. The 
happy look on the faces of the students is to be attributed not to th? inspiration of Mr. Seriously's 
remarks but to the fact that the next period is far advanced). 



117 



PEEPS RT REapLE 




PEEPS AT PEOPLE 

Madelyn Wesson: Have you got any green lipsticks? 

Clerk: Green lipsticks? 

Madelyn: Yes, Eve got a date tonight with a railroad man. 

Mr. Carter: Name a liquid that won't freeze. 
Dowdy: Hot water. 

Jack Houston: Mary says that I am a wit. 
Dailey: Well, she's half right. 

Josephine: What is the cure for love at first sight? 
Roxie: Second sight. 

Grisham: Waiter, has the girl at the next table paid her bill? 

Waiter: Yes, sir. 

Grisham: Good ; then I can flirt with her. 

Cop: You can't go there, Miss. It's a one-way street. 
Bromme: But I only want to go one way. 

Polly Gowan: One of my ancestors came over on the Mayflower. 
Mattie Wood: Really? How long is he going to stay? 

Dr. Steere: Never do anything that you would be ashamed for the whole world to see. 
Drewry: Hooray! I won't have to take any more baths. 

Katherine Hanna (at one a. m.) — Oh! wake up! I can just feel there's a mouse in the room 
Evelyn Pugh — Well, just feel a cat too, and go back to sleep. 

Jack Boone: Chilly, why have you got on your socks wrong side out? 
Chilly: My feet were hot and I turned the hose on them. 

Miss Love: What is the Order of the Bath? 

Duke: Pa first, then Ma, then us kids, and then the hired girl. 

Graham: Shall we sit this one out? 
Mary Sue: Oh, I'm so tired; let's dance. 



118 



Wilson Mount: I have a suit for every day in the week. 
Genola: Yes? 
Wilson: This is it. 

Mr. Baughan (lecturing) — One half of the world is ignorant how the other half lives. 
Jack Boone: Not in Henderson. 

Rochelle: Did you fill your date last night? 
Atkins: I hope so. She ate everything in sight. 

Doctor: Do you ever talk in your sleep? 

Dr. Steere: No, but I talk in other people's sleep. 

Miss Thomas: Monsieur, why were you late to class? 
Oldham: The bell rang before I got here. 

Mr. Carter (to pretty co-ed): Are you doing anything on Sunday evening? 

Pretty Co-ed (coyly) : Not a thing. 

Mr. Carter: Then try to get to class on time Monday morning. 

Dailey: Gimme a dime, sir, I'm a poor cripple. 
How are you crippled? 
Dailey: Financially. 

King Johnson: Did the doctor explain why your tongue is coated? 

Andy Miller: I'll say so! He advised me to stop kissing girls on their cheeks. 

Mr. Smith: When do you do your hardest work? 

Slick: Before breakfast. 

Mr. Smith: What do you do? 

Slick: Get outa bed. 

SONG OF THE GIRLS' PHYSICAL ED. CLASSES 

Bring back, bring back, 

Oh, bring back my bloomers to me ! 

A youth seated himself in a dentist's chair. He wore an elaborate checked suit; his shoes 
were loud tan with hobnail heels; his tie was a brilliant red; extreme balloon pants, of course. 
Along with this equipment he had the usual vacant stare. 

Said the dentist, "I am afraid to give him gas." 

"Why?" 

"Well, how will I know when the darn fool doesn't know anything?" 



WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN 

Mr. Scates, Vaudeville comedian, par excellence. 

Mr. Hughes, the second Sherlock Holmes. 

Dr. Smith, matron of an orphan asylum. 

Miss Coke, the charming snake-charmer. 

Mr. Austin, the balloon salesman at the circus. 

Dr. Steere, lecturer for the Society of Upholding Public Morals. 



119 



s 



raphs 




DoA/r STop 



125 



WEST TENNESSEE 
STATE TEACHERS 

CyOLLEGrE MEMPHIS 

A State College for the Training of Teachers 

Member Association of Colleges and Secondary School of the Southern States and of 
the American Association of Teachers' Colleges 

FOUR YEARS COLLEGE COURSE 

LEADING TO 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Curricula for Training Elementary and High School Teachers 

Strong Faculty of Forty Teachers — Commodious Academic 
Building — Handsome Dormitories with Every Modern Conveni- 
ence — Excellently Equipped Laboratories for the Study of 
Agriculture, Biology, Chemistry, Home Economics, Manual 
Training and Physics. 

NEW GYMNASIUM AND LIBRARY BUILDINGS JUST COMPLETED. 

Spacious Campus, Strong Athletics, Literary Societies, Musical Organizations, 

Christian Associations, Health Record Unexcelled 

Well-Equipped Training School, Elementary and Junior High 

Departments for Observation and Directed Teaching 

Four Quarters, Twelve Weeks Each 

FALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER U, 1928 

Tuition Free to Tennessee Students 

Cost of Nine Months Attendance, Including Board, Lodging, 

Laundry and School Fees, Only $250. 

FOR CATALOG AND OTHER INFORMATION, WRITE TO 

J. W. BRISTER, President— MEMPHIS 



126 



GET HAPPY 



k*S>< 



The name Happy on a feed bag is 
more than a trade-mark. It is your 
guarantee of economical results in 
livestock and poultry feeds. Happy 
Feeds are made to eut feeding costs. 
They do it. Lower feed eosts mean 
bigger profits. 

The Happy Way 

Thousands of livestock and poultry 
owners in the South are obtaining bet- 
ter profits from their livestock and 
poultry. They follow the Happy Way. 
They use Happy Feeds and the Happy 
Plan of feeding. Efficient feeds and 
improved feeding methods insure suc- 
cess in the production of livestock 
and poultry. 



Happy Feeds in Red Ball Bags 



DISTRIBUTED BY 



Highland Coal and Feed Co, 

Phone 7-7077 



BUNTVN 



TENN. 



127 



Red Oak Inn 



SANDWICHES THE BEST 



"HIGH SCORE" 

Spanish Sauce 



We Deliver — Phone No. 7-9267 



CORONA 

The Portable for Office and Home 

Standard Four Bank Keyboard 

Kenyon Taylor Co. 

"The Off iee Supply House of Memphis" 

60-62 Madison Ave. Memphis, Tenn. 

Phone 6-1089 

Price $60 JS"," 



"CANALE" 

Italian Gravy 



Good on Everything 
For Sale Everywhere 



D. Canale c% Co. 



Southwestern Fuel Company 



INCi iKI'i 1KATKI1 



906-907 Dermon Building 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



Miners and Shippers of 

CELEBRATED BLACK DIAMOND COAL 

MINES: DRAKESBORO, KENTUCKY 



Local and Long Distance 
Phones 6-3766 — 6-3830 



DOMESTIC GRADES BOOM-LOADED 
DOUBLE -SCREENED, HAND-PICKED 

6- in. Block 6xi^-in. Egg 

3- in. Lump 3x2- in. Egg 

ij4-in. Lump 3xi54-in. Nut 

6x3-in. Egg ALL STEAM GRADES 



Shippers Best (hade of Coal 
Mined on 

L. & N. R. R.—l. C. R. R. and 
Southern Ry. 

HI (HI GRADE 
Alabama, Jellico, Kentucky Coals 



Nature Made "Black Diamond" Good 
Our Preparation Made It Famous 



Louisville, Kentucky 
Starks Building 



Nashville, Tennessee 
Cotton States Bldg. 



128 















. 
















EVERYTHING FOR YOUR SHOES 

Elite Shoe Rebuilders 



— = — — — ■ — — ^4 — ■ — - — 

549 SOUTH HIGHLAND 
"The Neatest Work the Best Material" 



Warren 
Candy Company 



Telephone 6-6862 



341 Hernando St. 



MEMPHIS, TENN. 



*-and the 

invitations 
engraved by Toof 

One of the evidences of a perfect social 
function. 

The invitation is most expressive. It 
reflects careful preparation or marked 
indifference. 

The Toot engraved invitation lias the 
distinction of being the standard of ex- 
cellence and reflects elegance and re- 
finement in every detail. 

S. C. TOOF & CO. 

Printers - Engravers - Lithographers 
M E M PHIS 









DRAUGHON'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 

104 SOUTH THIRD STREET 
Opposite Peabody Hotel Phone 6-5255 

NEW LOCATION, NEW EQUIPMENT, NEW MANAGEMENT 

Colleges located in the principal cities of the South and Southwest. 
Scholarships transferable to any Draughon College. 

Over 350,000 successful graduates. Positions seemed. We also (each 
by correspondence. 

MEMPHIS' LARGEST SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 






129 























. 

























































































Dixie's Greatest Entertainment 

PANTAGES 

Continuous i to 1 1 P. M. 

Vaudeville and Feature Pictures 

Matinees: 15-300; Nights: 2050c. Saturday and Holiday Matinees: 15-50C 



WB HILL & Cp inc 



DESKS 

CHAIRS 

FILES 

SAFES 



\BusiimsFurniiureEi^siye^ 

294 Atacliscm Ave. h- ';;--# 6-630$ 
W.B.HILL' RD.FARRELL CRAMER SEXTON 



MEMPHIS PAPER CO. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 

WRAPPING PAPER — PAPER BAGS 



Manufacturers of 

Folding 
Paper 
Boxes 




TABLETS 



Headquarters for 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

PENCILS :-: CHALK 



Twine 

Toilet Paper 
Paper Towels 
Drinking Cups 






WAX CRAYONS 






Friends to the Community 




Our services are essential to modern communities. 

It is our desire to make these services satisfactory 
in the highest degree, and to co-operate with you 
in advancing community welfare. 

Things that benefit your community are an advan- 
tage to us. 

We consider that these mutual interests bind us 
to your endeavors in very close bounds of friendship. 



Memphis Power & Light Company 
The Memphis Street Railway Co. 



1 31 



ESTABLISHED 1877 



Serving' Southern Merchants for Fifty Years 

WHOLESALE 

Fruits - Vegetables - Produce 
Rice - Beans - Peas 



A. S. Barboro & Co., Inc 

The South' s Largest Dealers in Fruits, Vegetables and Produce 



Wishing Continued Success 
for Teachers College 



FROM 



Buntyn Builders 
Bible Class 



132 



S. G. SCOTT & CO 



t 



ALL KINDS OF 

CHOICE 
FRESH 
MEATS 



Wholesale and Retail 



PHONES SIX [^ 



200 Beale Avenue 



Beale Street Market 



MEMPHIS, TENN. 



133 



THIS SPACE IS 
DONATED by the 



Bluff City Delivery Co 



651 Beale Phone 6-0154 



ICE AND COAL 




Dedicated to the SEN IOR 
CLASS of the WEST 
TENNESSEE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 
the FUTURE EDUCA- 
TIONAL LEADERS of 
OUR STATE 



J 34 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Memphis Baking Co., Inc. 



BAKERS OF 



Certified 



BREAD 



The Big Double Loaf 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



CALL FOR IT BY NAME 



Highland 

Auto 
Company 

Call Us for Sudden Service 

7-1114-J 

JOHN STOCK, Manager 



The Style Shop 

J. SUMMERFIELD, Jr. 
17 North Main 

Inexpensive 

DRESSES 

COATS 

FURS 

of 
STY IE AND QUALITY 



'Cash Works Wonders at Style Shop' 



35 



With the Best Wishes 

OF THE 

Retail Clothiers Association 

OF 

Memph is 



m o ■- 



Oak Hall 

Phil A. Halle 

Beasly, Jones and Raglan d 

Golden Eagle 

Burk & Co. 

Sam Bacherig 

Walker M. Taylor 



136 



The 
Photographs 

FOR THIS ANNUAL 
WERE MADE BY 



E. H. CASSADAY 



The Gray Studio 



751 Poplar Avenue 



PHONE 2-7512 



EXCHANGE PHOTOS WITH YOUR CLASS MATES 
WE GIVE YOU S P E C I A I. P R I C E S 



'37 



Duggins' Pharmacy No. 2 



OUR MOTTO: 

The best is none too good — Service with a smile 



Drugs, Candy, Cigars, Toilet Articles 
Magazines, Soda Fountain 



CALL 7-5701 or 7-9251 



Clover Farms 

Ice Cream * 




CLOVER 
FARMS 




. 25c 



PINT BRICK . 

ALL FLAVORS 
AT 

Duggins' Pharmacy 

NORMAL, TEXN. 
For Free Delivery Call 7-5701 or 7-9251 



'33 



Normal- Buntyn Barber Shop 

Ladies 1 Hair Cutting a Specialty 

We appreciate the patronage of Teachers' College Students 
W. E. and L. A. McCUNE, Proprietors 



PHONE 6-6578 



^S 3 UNION AVE. 



Farber Brothers 

A utomobile Tailors 



Memphis, Tenn. 



Take Your Shoes to the 

Normal Shoe Shop 

CORNER SOUTHERN AND ECHOLS 
Th ■ Price and Quality are Right 

J. M. BOWLING 

PROPRIETOR 



Compliments of 

The Leader 

Gents' Furnishings, Ladies' 
Ready-to- Wear — Shoes 



551 SOUTH HIGHLAND 



Diamonds, Watches 
and Jewelry 

Manufacturers of Class Pins 

Geo. T. Brodnax, Inc. 

Main at Monroe 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



HARRY SCRUGGS 

Groceries and Confectionery 

LUNCHES FOR STUDENTS 

Opposite Normal Station 



i39 



Gauger-Korsmo Construction Company 




Compliments of 



Builders of 



New W.T.S.T.C. Library Building 

and 
Dormitory Additions 



Compliments of 



Bold Packing Co, 



107 South Front 



Niagara Hams and 
Bacon 



White Rose Lard 

Valleybrook Butter, Cheese 
and Eggs 




140 





MEMPHIS ENGRAVING CD. 

ILLUSTRATORS -* DESIGNERS ^PHOTOENGRAVERS-PHOTOGRAPHERS 




122 UNION AVE. 

5IH FL0OR.-DILLARDBLDG. 

fko*60728 



V 



School 
Annual 
Experts 



i + i 



ASK FOR 



Fortune's 

All -Cream 
Ice Cream 



A quality product in which 
you can taste the quality 

SOLD BY 

NORMAL DRUG CO. 






PEG- U 



s pAT. OFF. 



HAMS or BACON 



Famed for excellence for more than 100 years 



John Morrell &2 Co. 



Memphis Branch 
30-36 BEALE AVENUE 



"SINCE 1827' 



Phone 6-7240 



General Offices, 
OTTUMWA, IOWA 



142 



Lawn Mowers Sharpened ami 
Repaired 

Normal Hardware Co. 

Hardware 
Paints, Oil and Turpentine 

FLY SCREENS MADE TO ORDER 
553 S. Highland Phone 7-1367 



This is Life — 

helling hooks will help you to get 
the right start in life — Try it! 

S. E. P. CO. 

667 Shrine Bldg., Memphis, Tenn. 




Compliments of 

OHNSON'S 

GREENHOUSES 



"Home Grown Flowers" 

[61 Madison Ave. Phone 6-0983 



NORMAL-BUNTYN 
LUMBER CO. 

Lumber, Sash, Doors and 
Builders' Hardware 

Screen Doors and Windows 
Phone 7-1 781 574 Highland Ave. 



A PURITY BAKERIES 
PRODUCT 



TAYSTEE 

BREAD 



THE 22 SLICE QUALITY LOAF 



WINKELMAN 



143 



In all the New Buildings 
for the College 



Electrical Work 



BY 



McCrory Electric Co 



MEMPHIS, TENN. 



'Be Sure You're Insured'' 



L. W. Hughes 
<% Co. 

INSURANCE AND BONDING 



Tel. 6-7453 105-6 Porter Bldg. 



MUSIC HEADQUARTERS FOR MORE 
THAN ji YEARS 



PIANOS 

ORTHOPHONIC VIOTROLAS 

BAND AND ORCHESTRA 

INSTRUMENTS 

SHEET MUSIC 

O. K. Houck 
Piano Co. 

103 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
MEMPHIS 



144 



Seating and Supplies 
For the Schools 



J. F. Rogers Co 



COSTUMES 

MAKE-UP ACCESSORIES— WIGS 
BEARDS— MUSTACHES 

MINSTRELS, SCHOOL PLAYS, AMA- 
TEUR THEATRICALS, PARTIES, 
BALLS 

Send List of Requirements for Estimate 

MEMPHIS COSTUME & 
REGALIA CO. 



226 S. MAIN ST. 



PHONE 6-7536 



616-18 Empire Building 



Telephone 6-07 1 9 



Memphis, Tennessee 



MONEY TO LOAN 

on MEMPHIS REAL ESTATE 

FIRST AND SECOND MORGAGES 
Low Interest Rates — Easy Terms 

M. L. Martin & Co. 

Insurance — Bonds — Loans 

80 MADISON AVE. 6-7053 




i45 



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DID YOU SOLVE THIS ONE? 

// X=Quality and Y~Service and ' Z = Price and A = Econotny J then X-\-Y-\-Z, 
"when A is considered," = Fair Manufacturing Company, featuring Fair Brand 
Cleaning, School and Janitor Supplies. We hope you do not forget us. Very best 
wishes for your future. 

Uncle Sam, your Phone or Telegraph will help you any time, as well as our salesmen; 

in fact, our new four-story factory and entire organization is at your command. 



YOU CAN CLEAN 
UP WITH 



FAIR BRAND" 
PRODUCTS 




MUNICIPAL and 

INDUSTRIAL 

SPECIALTIES 

SWEEPING 
COMPOUNDS 

SOLUBIJE 
DISINFECTANTS 

Pine, 

Coal Tar, 

Formaldehyde, 

Odorless, 

Cresylic, 

Theatre Boucrii 



147 
























New Dormitory 

Furnished hy 

A r mstron g 
Furniture Co. 

MAIN AND JEFFERSON 



HOUSE -BOND 

I lard ware Co. 



101 ^outh Main and 1340 Madison 



THE DEPARTMENT 
TL 1 III) WA RE S TORES 



When leaving 



chosen 



OfFICE 



2fi 



OUT Of 
TOWN 




to take up your 



t,,/^'' 



vocation, send us your orders 



for Printing and 




<<s 



Office Supplies. 



And when planning your 



remember we make Engraved Invitations. 








E. 


H. 


CLARKE 


k BRO. 






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[TJONERS - PRINTERS 


ENGRAVERS : 


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t. H. f.l»»K( I 0PO,, MEMPMC 



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